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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here everyone,
Thought I'd give you a project update as to what I've been working on ever since AEM bought my Mustang GT Tesla conversion. I decided to make an all wheel drive electric Ford Focus but got lost in Covid hell. So in the mean time I designed and built a new Tesla motor conversion for putting in old Mustangs and Camaro's that does not mean cutting up a classic car. So I developed a split Tesla motor with pressurized oiling, ability to run forward or reverse continuously and direct connect u joints or other types of power take off options. Here's a few picks. I have on the test bench right now playing with it. RPM red line should be about 5700 RPMs as with most V8 cars of yesteryear or yesterday. The motor and inverter are separate units now. Anyway enjoy a few pics. I'll now be hunting the donor car for the project. I'd really like a 1968 Plymouth Barracuda for this.

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This is a pretty novel approach. I think one of the turnoffs of the Tesla swap is that it must use cv shafts direct to hubs. While this does work when purchasing engineered shafts and hubs, I have seen some pretty dangerous conversions with welded axles and such.

I will be interested in following this. What did you plan to do for differential gears?

James
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Flashman, I am using a 2019, 5.0 Mustang 3:55 gears track pack differential. I've changed my coupling to a quick disconnect for being able to tow it to the track without sacrificing battery at the tracks where there's no charging available. Pretty much the not so local Irwindale race track In California. The donor is a 2008 Volkswagen Rabbit. Hopefully it will be as clean or cleaner than my 2007 Mustang GT Tesla swap. You can see that one on Youtube, I have the whole build there start to finish. Here's some pics of the new setup.

IMG_4524.JPG IMG_4537.JPG IMG_4538.JPG
 

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I am using a 2019, 5.0 Mustang 3:55 gears track pack differential.
...
The donor is a 2008 Volkswagen Rabbit.
Since you show the entire rear suspension and subframe from the Mustang, are you using that in the Rabbit body? That should work, although of course it means substantial structural changes and there's a five-inch track width difference to accommodate... wide rear fenders would presumably be in the plan.

By coincidence, the Ford Mustang independent rear suspension is of the same design (Integral Link) as the Tesla Model S/X independent rear suspension. Ford, Jaguar, BMW and Alfa Romeo all use the integral link design; BMW has been using it for three decades.

An alternative would be to just swap the entire Model 3 rear drive unit with subframe and suspension - no drivetrain customization needed, motor and gearbox tucked into the subframe, and a better track width match. Of course, then there would be no need for the split Model S drive unit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Since you show the entire rear suspension and subframe from the Mustang, are you using that in the Rabbit body? That should work, although of course it means substantial structural changes and there's a five-inch track width difference to accommodate... wide rear fenders would presumably be in the plan.

By coincidence, the Ford Mustang independent rear suspension is of the same design (Integral Link) as the Tesla Model S/X independent rear suspension. Ford, Jaguar, BMW and Alfa Romeo all use the integral link design; BMW has been using it for three decades.

An alternative would be to just swap the entire Model 3 rear drive unit with sub frame and suspension - no drivetrain customization needed, motor and gearbox tucked into the subframe, and a better track width match. Of course, then there would be no need for the split Model S drive unit.

Hi Brian, That's the easy way out, that's no fun, I need projects I can wrap my brain around not copy what someone else is doing. I've already done a Model S Sport motor and subframe into a 2007 Mustang GT which was insane. Actually AEM performance electronics bought that car from me. I've already been down the whole Model S/X and Model 3 subframe road. That's what everyone else is doing now. The Model 3 drive train is narrower, more expensive, and harder to control as everyone wants your first born child for a motor controller for it. Once some people have hacked it and there's is some competition out there control board prices will come down. I'm hoping Damien McGuire Board will finish his design, I have plans to build a few cars with them, until then I'll keep playing with Tesla S motors. I like creating and designing new things, I get bored with the same old, same old. This motor setup is for someone to use in a front engined old Mustang or Camaro and keep there rearend and not have to cut anything up as this setup will go where the engine went using a 2 piece driveshaft. Plus a whole base Tesla model S motor and inverter can be had for about $2500. Try buying a 3 phase off the shelf motor and inverter, that puts out 300+ HP. it's ridiculous. So I'll just keep doing my thing. I'm just building a test vehicle for myself and of course it will have rear flares, kinda like a rally car, just fun.
 

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That's the easy way out, that's no fun, I need projects I can wrap my brain around not copy what someone else is doing.
I get that - it's the "makes no sense but is a fun project" approach. Next, build a four-wheel-drive jacked-up diesel Corvette...

This motor setup is for someone to use in a front engined old Mustang or Camaro and keep there rearend and not have to cut anything up as this setup will go where the engine went using a 2 piece driveshaft.
I understand that, but the Rabbit isn't a longitudinal engine RWD vehicle like a Mustang or Camaro.
 

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The Model 3 drive train is narrower...
Yes, that (and having the motor ahead of the axle line rather than behind it) is why the Model 3/Y rear drive unit (particularly with subframe and suspension) is more suited to the Rabbit or a similar conversion than the Model S/X equivalent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actually what does the Rabbit have to do with it? It's just a body I choose. I have 6 batteries in the engine compartment. My idea was with the motor directly attached to the Mustang diff I can get the perfect weight ratio and I can change the ring and pinion from 3.15 to 4.56, actually even higher but I won't be climbing any walls with it. Tesla is 3.14 to 1 if you want to compare. Can you change the rear ring and pinion on a Tesla on a whim? Not really. Zero EV makes I believe a 4.15 to 1 or something close to that for big tire Land rovers so there's no sense in bringing that up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I could of put the engine under the hood of the rabbit but I decide not to. I'm testing reduction drive that I designed for the motor, not a drive shaft.
 

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There's a real market for this. Right now, the only motor that is easily hooked up to a driveshaft or ICE transmission is the pricey aftermarket AC51/Hyper9 or the Nissan Leaf. The Tesla motor has more torque and a higher RPM than all of them...and now that I know half the Tesla motor is a detachable inverter...it makes packaging much easier since they can be separated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Tremelune, My thoughts exactly, this should be an affordable alternative to high cost low horsepower setups. I guess "affordable" is in the eyes of the person doing the build.
 

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Hi Flashman, I am using a 2019, 5.0 Mustang 3:55 gears track pack differential. I've changed my coupling to a quick disconnect for being able to tow it to the track without sacrificing battery at the tracks where there's no charging available. Pretty much the not so local Irwindale race track In California. The donor is a 2008 Volkswagen Rabbit. Hopefully it will be as clean or cleaner than my 2007 Mustang GT Tesla swap. You can see that one on Youtube, I have the whole build there start to finish. Here's some pics of the new setup.

View attachment 122723 View attachment 122724 View attachment 122725
Hey Roadstercycle I have an Avanti on a custom chassis with a T Bird Sc drive train less engine that I want to convert to EV it looks to me this set up would work with that drive train , what are your thoughts?
 

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Here everyone,
Thought I'd give you a project update as to what I've been working on ever since AEM bought my Mustang GT Tesla conversion. I decided to make an all wheel drive electric Ford Focus but got lost in Covid hell. So in the mean time I designed and built a new Tesla motor conversion for putting in old Mustangs and Camaro's that does not mean cutting up a classic car. So I developed a split Tesla motor with pressurized oiling, ability to run forward or reverse continuously and direct connect u joints or other types of power take off options. Here's a few picks. I have on the test bench right now playing with it. RPM red line should be about 5700 RPMs as with most V8 cars of yesteryear or yesterday. The motor and inverter are separate units now. Anyway enjoy a few pics. I'll now be hunting the donor car for the project. I'd really like a 1968 Plymouth Barracuda for this.

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Looks a little too compact for the HP.

What chain and sprockets (incl ratio) did you use to get from the motor to the driveshaft yoke?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Looks a little too compact for the HP.

What chain and sprockets (incl ratio) did you use to get from the motor to the driveshaft yoke?
I don't use chain and sprockets for this reduction. It is a helical gear reduction. The gears are good for over 600 HP. I'm building this to test the housing, bearings and external oil pump for spraying the bearings similar to the model 3 setup but my own design.
 

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What chain and sprockets (incl ratio) did you use to get from the motor to the driveshaft yoke?
As already explained, it's a gear drive.

As for the ratio...
RPM red line should be about 5700 RPMs...
If the motor's redline is 14,000, that implies a reduction ratio of about 2.45:1.

I would guess - and it's just a guess - that the stock Tesla first-stage reduction gears are being used. The overall reduction of the large drive unit is something like 9.7:1, but it's done in two stages, and this conversion wouldn't be using the second stage.
 

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That would make sense as the motor shaft pinion would be a total pain to mount, otherwise.

That said, a 5000+ rpm driveshaft speed may be gearing it too tall for street use
 

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That said, a 5000+ rpm driveshaft speed may be gearing it too tall for street use
The sample installation uses a Mustang final drive with a 3.55:1 ratio, which seems like a reasonable typical use. At 5700 RPM driveshaft speed, that's 1605 RPM axle speed. With the stock tire size of that car (315/30R19 for the GT350R track pack), that's 123 MPH or 198 km/h. That makes sense for a car that will see track use, and most variants of a 2019 Mustang can go much faster; however, a street-only car could use significantly shorter gearing for better acceleration. With only one ratio offered in the drive unit, the final drive ratio can be changed to suit the application; if the donor car were a track pack Mustang GT350 it would have had a 3.73:1, and even shorter ratios (such as 4.10:1) are available for that Ford "Super 8.8" final drive.
 
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