DIY Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Is it possible to put a shaft on the other end of a telsa motor?
Almost anything is 'possible' but this would be classed as extremely difficult by most people.

A more realistic approach IMO is to use modified gearing in the transmission case. This allows you to play with final drive ratios and remove the differential if you require a fixed drive shaft.

Chris Hazell is doing a lot of work inside the Tesla drive unit... watch this space :)

http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showpost.php?p=990569&postcount=23
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Well I'm trying to connect about 6 of them together in series mechanically. Any idea how?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,664 Posts
To be honest, im not sure that AMG /Cigarette boat ever got beyond someones CGI renderings . I dont think its ever been seen in public .
But the design concept and details are impressive,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Correct me if I'm wrong but on most model s if not all arent two motors hooked together at a gearbox anyway. So then the output shafts can already handle twice the output.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
733 Posts
What looks like a second motor on the rear drive of the S and X is actually the enclosure for the motor control inverter. Look-up Tesla inverter and you'll see inside the cylindrical enclosure.

The new Roadster has dual rear motors (and a single in front).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
But the design concept and details are impressive,
To me it looks like the rube goldberg version of a fan motor. I mean I get having some redundancy, but they seem to have taken it to places it was never meant to go. two packs and two motors and controllers would do nicely (and be more efficient), but they have 12 motors and 12 "controllers" and there is another controller looking thing upstream from the controllers, perhaps to reconfigure the battery or something, and wires everywhere. I don't know if "impressive" is the word I would use, especially with the efficiency hit and over-complicated layout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The Tesla drive does seem to be quite expensive and the concept I had in mind hinged mainly on finding them salvaged. Is there anything of similar power ac off the shelf preferably with dual shaft?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,664 Posts
To me it looks like the rube goldberg version of a fan motor. I mean I get having some redundancy, but they seem to have taken it to places it was never meant to go. two packs and two motors and controllers would do nicely (and be more efficient), but they have 12 motors and 12 "controllers" and there is another controller looking thing upstream from the controllers, perhaps to reconfigure the battery or something, and wires everywhere. I don't know if "impressive" is the word I would use, especially with the efficiency hit and over-complicated layout.
I think you missed the point..
They could have done many things differently, different motors, batteries, drive units, evn the colour could have been "different" :rolleyes:
....but the thing was a "showcase" for AMG/Cig" technology, ...deliberately laid out and presented to draw attention and comment.
If they wanted it to be practical and competitive, it would likely have had 4 Lamborghini 7 ltr marine ICEs !
Remember the OP was asking for ideas on how to couple 6 Tesla motors to one output....the boat was just an illustration to suggest how it could be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,907 Posts
Is there anything of similar power ac off the shelf preferably with dual shaft?
I don't think you'll find any modern EV motor with a dual-ended shaft, because there is no reason to want two shaft outputs. In those rare cases where a motor is designed to be stacked end-to-end (transmitting each motor's output through the next motor's shaft), it will probably have a female spline in one end, rather than two protruding shafts. The YASA 400 is an example of a motor which has a female spline right through it, so multiple motors can be stacked on one splined shaft.

Typically "pancake" style motors (relatively large diameter and axially short) are more likely to be designed to stack; YASA is an example.

The Tesla drive does seem to be quite expensive and the concept I had in mind hinged mainly on finding them salvaged.
Tesla Model S/X motors are the most common EV motors which are available in salvage and have a high power rating in the original vehicle. On the other hand, most EV manufacturers rate their motors for continuous duty, and some of those motors may be just as capable as Tesla's.

At some point the costs of extra mechanical complexity and multiple inverters will probably exceed the cost of just getting the right motor to start. That silly cigarette boat is designed to be visibly expensive - it's all about conspicuous consumption.

There are some really big motors made for large vehicles. Pushed to higher than rated power for brief periods (and a Tesla motor can only produce its rated power for a brief period), just one of them might be a better solution. TM4 makes some big stuff for trucks and buses, but I don't know how to get them at retail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,907 Posts
The new Roadster has dual rear motors...
... and even then, each motor will presumably drive a separate wheel; it would make no sense for Tesla to use to motors to drive one shaft.

The Fisker Karma does have two motors driving the rear axle, but that was likely a matter of what off-the-shelf motor and inverter they could get, and perhaps the difficulty of finding the right location for one really large motor. These two motors are not directly connected to each other - they drive two separate inputs of one gearbox.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top