DIY Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,094 Posts
Is there anything of similar power ac off the shelf preferably with dual shaft?
I don't think you'll find any modern EV motor with a dual-ended shaft, because there is no reason to want two shaft outputs. In those rare cases where a motor is designed to be stacked end-to-end (transmitting each motor's output through the next motor's shaft), it will probably have a female spline in one end, rather than two protruding shafts. The YASA 400 is an example of a motor which has a female spline right through it, so multiple motors can be stacked on one splined shaft.

Typically "pancake" style motors (relatively large diameter and axially short) are more likely to be designed to stack; YASA is an example.

The Tesla drive does seem to be quite expensive and the concept I had in mind hinged mainly on finding them salvaged.
Tesla Model S/X motors are the most common EV motors which are available in salvage and have a high power rating in the original vehicle. On the other hand, most EV manufacturers rate their motors for continuous duty, and some of those motors may be just as capable as Tesla's.

At some point the costs of extra mechanical complexity and multiple inverters will probably exceed the cost of just getting the right motor to start. That silly cigarette boat is designed to be visibly expensive - it's all about conspicuous consumption.

There are some really big motors made for large vehicles. Pushed to higher than rated power for brief periods (and a Tesla motor can only produce its rated power for a brief period), just one of them might be a better solution. TM4 makes some big stuff for trucks and buses, but I don't know how to get them at retail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,094 Posts
The new Roadster has dual rear motors...
... and even then, each motor will presumably drive a separate wheel; it would make no sense for Tesla to use to motors to drive one shaft.

The Fisker Karma does have two motors driving the rear axle, but that was likely a matter of what off-the-shelf motor and inverter they could get, and perhaps the difficulty of finding the right location for one really large motor. These two motors are not directly connected to each other - they drive two separate inputs of one gearbox.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top