DIY Electric Car Forums banner

Tesla Powered BMW E31 8 Series

40531 Views 110 Replies 25 Participants Last post by  jackbauer
So some of you might already know about my E31 conversion as it's been going on 3 years now! Currently running a Siemens 1pv5135 motor and DIY inverter and 6 speed manual gearbox. Has been running very well the last few months but with the Tesla components becoming available and my work on the open source control boards progressing nicely I've decided to convert the E31. Again.

I had originally thought to use the small high efficiency drive unit but decided to go all in and put in the Large rear unit for 450hp+ :D

Going to be getting some help and the use of a workshop and vehicle lift for the drive unit install as it will need some serious work done to the rear subframe and boot floor. Once the drive unit is in then I can start putting some batteries into that nice big empty engine compartment. Should make quite a fun car and test bed for the open source control board. Stay tuned:)

Attachments

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Administrator
Joined
·
6,613 Posts
I'm hitting 1200 amps and 340 v with my "most of a Volt" pack

I expect that

(1) Jack will be able to pull a lot more out of the Tesla pack - for a short time and the pack probably won't last 200,000 miles being treated like that

(2) Jack will be able to get a LOT more than 600 Hp out of that motor - with the same provision - for a short time and the motor probably won't last 200,000 miles being treated like that

Tesla has to be careful - they are expecting 999 out of 1000 people to be able to get 200,000 miles

We - as "Enthusiasts" are willing to accept much worse results - in exchange for more power
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
6,613 Posts
It is tidy, but the fit is only easy into rear-wheel drive vehicle with a trailing or semi-trailing arm rear suspension; the motor will interfere with the control arms or subframe of almost any multi-link or double-A-arm suspension not designed specifically to accommodate this drive unit. That design is obsolete now, but was standard practice for rear-engined vehicles (especially VW) and for a few decades of rear-drive front-engine cars with IRS... such as BMW, Mercedes, Datsun, Toyota, etc.
Disagree completely
The advantage of that design is that you only need mounting points for the cross beam
It would be a doddle fitting that in the back of almost any front or rear wheel drive car

All you need is lots of cutting discs and the correct attitude
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top