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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As my Miles ZX40s pickup is not any fun- A power train swap is emanate.

The only system that is publicly sorted out for re-use, (Documented) is the Tesla Model S system it is my first choice. The batteries are pricey, however you can both cool and heat them easily to match charging requirements due to weather, and they are readily available.

* Tesla and Smart traction motors are both "Gear reduced one speed, and simple to mount, as both have rubber mounting ears and both will give ample power to a 1500 lb. mini truck.
* Tesla wins the infinite burnout capability, and would likely be worth the extra $1500.
* Tesla top speed is approximately 15 mph, not necessarily a requirement in a 10' long Kei Truck.

1. Has anyone mounted an electric motor to a front drive transmission in a North - South configuration? IE GM, Suzuki, Smart, Ford, Nissan, Fiat, Hyundai, Kia.
2. Or used a Tesla traction motor in a swap?

post id: 7040843740 on Orange County Craigslist
 

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Hi there,

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Niall
 

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I would wager that swapping a Smart ED motor and gear drive would be FAR easier except that I've heard of issues of powering them outside of their intended chassis. I looked at buying essentially a complete ED from EV West and they told me that I'd be on my own for making it work as they can't get the power steering motor, or anything to operate without the complete system.

I don't think a tesla drive unit would even remotely fit in that little truck and if it did it would likely twist it in half upon initial acceleration.

Possibly something like a AC-31/50 would be better suited for that application.

I'm a noob so take that with a grain of salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Perhaps the Nissan Leaf drive motor system, it makes double the power of the Smart and in original form travels three times as far with a decent battery pack, I spotted someone on this forum stated he had made a custom controller for the Nissan Leaf. Leaf drive systems are relatively inexpensive, and 236 ft lbs of torque would propel the Mini truck with snow tracks just swell.

As a comparison, took a look under a Dymac EV Pickup that was for sale on Monday in San Berardino, it has no transmission just a U joint mounted to the output shaft, to the Electric Motor's drive shaft. Easy to drive and accelerate, I estimate about 30HP is all. (No wheel spin rewards).
Dymac EV truck1.jpg

"The 2018 Nissan Leaf's electric power train consists of a 40 kWh battery pack that powers an electric motor that produces 147 hp and 236 lb-ft of torque" Motortrend.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I would wager that swapping a Smart ED motor and gear drive would be FAR easier except that I've heard of issues of powering them outside of their intended chassis. I looked at buying essentially a complete ED from EV West and they told me that I'd be on my own for making it work as they can't get the power steering motor, or anything to operate without the complete system.

I don't think a Tesla drive unit would even remotely fit in that little truck and if it did it would likely twist it in half upon initial acceleration.
My envisioned Mini Miles Truck installation is placing a mass produced electric high speed motor coupled with a gear reduced final output with one speed, like a Tesla RWD, (9.34:1 9.73:1); Or Smart or Leaf FWD, (9.3:1); All mounted sideways in the ladder style frame, or east west configuration. This puts a drive option facing front and rear on either the passenger side or driver side.

The Japanese JDM mini trucks utilize a North /South, Engine /Motor configuration, with a transfer case, with centered rear drive shaft and a Passenger side front drive shaft on 90's models and Drivers side front drive shaft, at least on Suzuki and Dihatsu 4Wd models.

Does anyone on this forum have the dimensions of the Tesla /Smart units?
*Transmission configuration visual.
 

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As someone mentioned, the first hard part is how to control the Smart motor. They're rare compared to Tesla stuff, and few people are working to open them up. There are several solutions available for Tesla motors. If I were going to put effort into learning, I would put it into Tesla or Leaf components, as I expect them to dominate the conversion scene for the next few years, due to cost and availability.

If you plan to run an EV gearbox longitudinally, I don't think you'll have a problem fitting any motor you want. The hard bit then becomes ensuring the driveshaft angles match.

https://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/level-does-motor-need-73104.html

I believe they need to match precisely to avoid rapid wear, but I can't find my source for that...

You might be able to find Tesla motor info here: https://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/tesla-small-drive-unit-194521.html
 

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My envisioned Mini Miles Truck installation is placing a mass produced electric high speed motor coupled with a gear reduced final output with one speed, like a Tesla RWD, (9.34:1 9.73:1); Or Smart or Leaf FWD, (9.3:1)...
The Leaf overall drive ratio is usually specified as 7.937:1, although the 2018 and later model has a 8.19:1 ratio.

In the original Leaf transaxle (prior to 2018), according to someone who spent some tedious time counting, a 17-tooth input gear drives a 31-tooth gear on the intermediate shaft, and a 17-tooth gear on the intermediate shaft drive a 74-tooth ring gear around the differential, resulting in that 7.937:1 ratio. Other common EVs use the same design, varying in the gear sizes. A few use planetary gears to keep everything concentric, so one output shaft goes through the hollow centre of the motor shaft.
 
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