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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
*this setup is not in a vehicle
Been working on setting up this rig for what will become R&D essentially, and I can't seem to get it to work...
Details;
-6ea 12v 35ah deep cycle sealed lead acid batteries wired in series for 72v pack.
-Motor is a Raymond 36v model 203-02-4005
-Controller is a curtis 1221m-6701

Like I said. After wiring it all up the motor doesn't seem to want to turn. Not sure if my issue is with the motor (do I need to modify it so I can over volt to 72v?). Or if my issue is the controller somehow... (do I need to buy a programmer to trouble shoot)?

Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated. I'm brand new to all of this (one of the reasons I'm starting out with this test setup) I have lots to learn for sure.
 

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Should be easy to narrow down, as you're using a series-wound DC motor.

Skip the controller, and just see if you can get the motor to spin using a single lead acid battery.

To make the motor spin, pretty simple, you should have 4 terminals. Electrically, the motor is just 2 coils. 2 of those terminals are the ends of one coil, the other 2 are the ends of the other coil. To temporarily wire it, you need to connect one wire from one coil, to a wire from the other coil. Doesn't matter which (it'll determine direction it spins). Then put + and - on the other two unoccupied terminals. The second you touch the last wire it's going to spark and start spinning the motor, so make sure the motor is chalked with something so it doesn't flip and roll away.

So, 4 terminals, call them A, B, C, D.
Coil 1 is A and B.
Coil 2 is C and D.

Connect either A or B to either C or D (doesn't matter). Suppose you connect B to C with a heavy wire (jumper cable, whatever). Then A and D become + and - (doesn't matter which).

When you make that last connection, I usually tap it, and expect sparks. The reason I tap is because my brain can't observe and react fast enough if something goes wrong. So I tap and then wait for my brain to catch up to my observations a couple seconds later. Then I might tap it for 1 second. Then if all's okay, I might hold it on for 3-5 seconds.

If the motor spins up, your motor is fine. (Your motor is almost certainly fine). If it doesn't spin up, you probably did something wrong and the motor is still fine.

If you can't figure out which terminals belong to which coil, it's not rocket science and it's not catastrophic if you get it wrong. You'll get sparks but no rotation (don't leave it that way for more than a second or two, power is still flowing). Just move one endpoint of the jumper wire to a different terminal (you'll have 2 choices and both will work). You could use an ohmmeter to measure which terminals have low resistance and are therefor the same coil, but, it's not a big deal. There are 6 possible ways to blindly connect your diagonal wire, 4 of those will work, 2 of those won't work. 67% chance of getting it right blindly.

AB wrong (same coil)
AC right
AD right
BC right
BD right
CD wrong (same coil)

The problem is almost certainly your controller or the way you've wired it. I have no advice on that, other than call for service or service manual or give us a lot more detail on how you've hooked it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the reply! After some tinkering I was able to pinpoint the issue. The wiring diagram seemed to indicate that the key switch needed to be wired to the 12v positive when in fact it needed the juice from the full battery pack. I just happened to notice it when watching some YouTube how to vids. Works great now!

Thanks again!
 
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