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Nice solution. I was frustrated that the Orion and the ACX1 cannot communicate CCL and DCL between them over CAN. I kept pestering Netgain and Ewert about it but I gave up - maybe there will be a firmware upate at some point to enable it.
Happy to read that I'm not the only looking for this, it's quite crucial if we want a power decrease instead of an exceeding of the limits & the BMS shutting down the all system ! The only solution is to have a microcontroller between both taking the information on Can from the BMS & sending it analogically to the controller.
 

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Greetings! New user here. Signed up because my Hyper9HV is on its way to me, and will soon be going in a Pinto. Wanted to add to the discussion about the precharge circuit on the X144 controller. It seems as if Netgain has added a little bit to the HV manual showing a relay in the precharge area. I also found this updated photo of the X144 showing the precharge connection and what I presume to be the resistor. Anybody wired one up yet?
 

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Greetings! New user here. Signed up because my Hyper9HV is on its way to me, and will soon be going in a Pinto. Wanted to add to the discussion about the precharge circuit on the X144 controller. It seems as if Netgain has added a little bit to the HV manual showing a relay in the precharge area. I also found this updated photo of the X144 showing the precharge connection and what I presume to be the resistor. Anybody wired one up yet?
Ok, now that is quite different.
Any word from Netgain about if this only applies to a new model X144 or if they now recommend something different for older units?
 

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Ok, got this response today, and pretty sure it only applies to the X144:
"The Precharge B+ Terminal can be hard wired to battery pack positive, or switched on via your key switch using the included HV Precharge relay.

Hard wired: Precharge will always see voltage when the high voltage battery pack circuit is closed. This means less cycles of the controller’s internal Precharge circuit. It will also leave a parasitic drain on your battery pack. If you will be certain to open a high voltage maintenance switch while leaving the vehicle unattended for weeks at a time, then this option will work well.

HV Precharge Relay: This will Precharge your controller upon startup every time. It will eliminate a parasitic drain on your High Voltage pack. The key switch must have an On position that energizes the HV Precharge Relay coil before the key is turned to the Start position, which will close 12V+ to K1-24."
 

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Hi Guys,

I have a basic question that I can not seem to find an answer for, probably me not being able to google properly😋. What is the difference between the Hyper9 and the Hyper9HV. I mean practical difference. I understand different voltages and controllers etc. Is the advantage of the HV the fact that it is a lower amp motor so I do not need as high discharge from my batteries? I've looked at the specs and the charts but still not sure exactly what the driving factor in choice between them is. I am in the planning stage right now, I like the hyper 9 and will use one but its whether or not I go for the hyper 9 or hyper9 HV, then I can plan my battery pack accordingly. Thanks for any help.
 

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What is the difference between the Hyper9 and the Hyper9HV. I mean practical difference. I understand different voltages and controllers etc.
They are made of exactly the same parts, except that the HV has more turns of finer wire in the stator winding. That means it can make the same torque with less current, but requires more voltage... and that's the practical difference.

Try this: load the HyPer 9 performance chart and the HyPer 9HV performance chart in their own tabs of your web browser, and click back and forth between them... you should be able to see that the shape of the curves and the power used and produced at any speed are the same; the only difference is that the HV version takes more DC link voltage (144 V vs 108 V from the battery to the controller) to do the same thing. That higher voltage means less current - NetGain doesn't show the DC link current, but if at the same speed and torque output they're using about the same power, then higher voltage means less current.

The NetGain performance charts show motor current and voltage, which are not battery current and voltage. Since the controller is a voltage converter (the output voltage is the same as or less voltage than the input, and the output current is proportionally the same as or more current than the input), you can't directly compare battery current from this data - you would need to calculate it.

Is the advantage of the HV the fact that it is a lower amp motor so I do not need as high discharge from my batteries?
Absolutely not. The discharge current from the battery is the power you are using divided by the battery voltage. The power you are using is determined how fast you are going and how hard you are accelerating or climbing; it doesn't depend on you choice of motor windings. Yes, the HV motor uses less current (and more voltage), but that doesn't change what the battery needs to supply for any given amount of motor power output.

If two otherwise identical EVs are being driven exactly the same way, but one has a HyPer 9 and the other has a HyPer 9 HV, they'll be using the same current from the battery. The current through the motor will be different, as the controller will be converting the power to a different voltage. To get full performance from the motor, the one with the HV motor will need a higher-voltage battery.

I've looked at the specs and the charts but still not sure exactly what the driving factor in choice between them is. I am in the planning stage right now, I like the hyper 9 and will use one but its whether or not I go for the hyper 9 or hyper9 HV, then I can plan my battery pack accordingly.
Often motor voltage is related to different speed capability of the motor, but not in this case, at least the way the controller is programmed.

Yes, the battery is the difference. For instance, if you have chosen a 100 Ah cell with a nominal voltage of 3.75 V and determined that 90 of them would provide enough energy (34 kWh) and be able to deliver enough power, you might configure those 90 cells as 30S 3P (113 V and 300 Ah nominal) for the regular HyPer 9 versus 45S 2P (169 V and 200 Ah nominal) for the HyPer 9 HV. You could even use the higher-voltage battery configuration for both motors, but you couldn't use the lower-voltage configuration for the HV and get full power from it.

I think in more practical terms current builders are trying to make salvaged battery modules work, and would want to choose a motor to suit a workable combination of modules but the principles are the same.
 

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Hey team. I apologize if this isn't wholly relevant to the Hyper 9 motor but I believe that it mostly is.

I've had Tesla batteries sitting in my garage waiting to be charged/balanced for 4 months now and it's time I get a move on.

Probably one of the lesser qualified people in this thread but alas, here I am attempting to put together my schematic. I just wanted to get some other more qualified eyes on it before I nail everything down.

This is obviously missing the motor, controller, throttle, charge controller, and j1772 wiring, but for the main system, this is what I've been planning. Does this seem about right? You can tell it's mostly based on the EVWest schematic.

Some basic key questions I've got are:

1. What was/is the best order of operations as far as wiring goes?

My plan has been to attack the individual battery boxes with their fuses, bms connections, and coolant lines first. Then move onto the contactor box w/o connecting high voltage, hooking up all the charger connections, DC/DC Converter, 12V system, and contactors. Then connect the motor and controller, and finally the HV system.

2. Contactors for each battery box or fuses and just one contactor?

I've seen people go back and forth on this. My plan is just to have the motor contactor, a 12V contactor and then fuses between each battery box.

3. Where should I worry about emi?

In your experience has this been an issue? Where and for what things do you use shielded cables? Is leaving the 12V fuse block and BMS in the contactor box a bad idea? Should they be housed separately?


123467


Any added tips/pointers are greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Yes, low voltage before high voltage is a good plan. Best to leave the connections for the motor and inverter for last. Your plan sounds all good. Not necessary to use a contactor for each battery box. Just a fuse is sufficient. There is also a big shortage of contactors at the moment (3 months backordered) so even if you wanted one, you would have to forego them at least for now.

EMI is not a big issue with DC and as such there shouldn't be any issue with having a BMS next to a DC contactor and busbar. The 3 AC phases from motor to inverter are the biggest sources of EMI. Shielded wiring may be necessary for those cable runs.
 

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Does anyone know how to set a maximum current that the ACX1 controller can draw from the pack? My pack is fused at 600A, and I want to make sure that cannot be exceeded.

There is a 'motor limit current map' in the SME software, might this be it?

Thanks in advance ...
 
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