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Could someone summarize the pros ( if there are any) and the cons of using a fairly new battery( batteries ) from say a Leaf , Ford Fusion , Bolt , etc for my Volkswagen conversion.
Not everyone has $6-9 K for used Tesla batteries , even though they are the " best " choice....

Maybe I was a little careless when I wrote just " hybrid " ...I meant hybrid or pure battery -electric like Tesla
 

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Hybrid vehicles tend to have tiny batteries, like a few kWhs (which would be enough for only a few miles of EV driving). There is not really a "best" choice for batteries that will fit every build. Your design voltage, range, physical space available, cargo capacity, desired power output, fabrication ability, and even climate will all play a bigger role in which battery pack will be most suited to your project.
 

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Could someone summarize the pros ( if there are any) and the cons of using a fairly new battery( batteries ) from say a Leaf , Ford Fusion , Bolt , etc for my Volkswagen conversion.
Not everyone has $6-9 K for used Tesla batteries , even though they are the " best " choice....
Of those only the Fusion is a hybrid - the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Bolt are battery-electric vehicles, just like a Tesla.

And it is not at all agreed that Tesla batteries are the "best" choice.
 

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Could someone summarize the pros ( if there are any) and the cons of using a fairly new battery( batteries ) from [a hybrid]
Hybrid vehicles tend to have tiny batteries, like a few kWhs (which would be enough for only a few miles of EV driving).
Non-plug-in hybrids have really tiny batteries, typically around one kilowatt-hour, which is useless.

Plug-in hybrids have much larger batteries, but still small compared to a battery-electric vehicle; typically they run 8 kWh to 16 kWh. Because of that lack of capacity, they are generally a poor choice for an EV, but some conversions are small enough and the range requirement is short enough that they will work, and some builders combine two plug-in hybrid packs for double the capacity... and more battery management complication.

Plug-in hybrids do have one advantage for some projects: although their energy capacity is low, their power capability is relatively high for their size. The Chevrolet Volt pack is well-known for this purpose, and can produce at least 120 kW for 10 seconds... probably more than an older Leaf pack of twice the energy capacity.

The main reason for conversions using plug-in hybrid battery modules is simply that they have been available - there have been more Chevrolet Volts built than most EV models, and some retailers have been selling large quantities of the LG Chem modules which are intended for the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid.

There is not really a "best" choice for batteries that will fit every build. Your design voltage, range, physical space available, cargo capacity, desired power output, fabrication ability, and even climate will all play a bigger role in which battery pack will be most suited to your project.
Well said. :)(y)
 

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Your pros and cons are different than Brian's, OR-Carl's, mine, or anybody else's because they are based on CRITERIA which are application specific as well as specific to you personally (wallet size, gonad size, skill set, local availability, conversion vehicle, environmental consideration, generalized degree of despise for Elon Musk, etc).

This is one you need to do yourself
 
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