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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Im new to the whole EV conversion thing and was wondering what are the main downsides to using a PHEV motor and battery for a conversion? I am assuming its low range, but are there any more disadvantages? Could the range be improved by utilising 2 PHEV battery packs?

In regards to the transplant, would it be feasible to utilise an Outlander rear drive unit with the 13.8kWh pack and get any kind of range? In my simple mind, if the 'full electric mode' of the vehicle provided a 30 - 40 mile range, then this should be whats expected from the conversion? What other parts would be required from the donor vehicle?

Motor / Battery / Charger / Controller

Thanks in advance
 

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The usual problem with using PHEV components is that the motor is integrated with a transmission, so it's not convenient to use just the motor separately. The rear drive unit of the Outlander PHEV is a solution - it is completely separate from the engine and transmission in the front - but you need to keep in mind that it is only one of the Outlander's two motors, so it will only have adequate power if your vehicle is lighter.

The Outlander's rear drive unit motor is the Meiden Y61. The Outlander's motor/generators were discussed in the thread 67 VW Beetle motor - Meiden 60kW EV Motor?

The problem with PHEV batteries is that the are small (in energy capacity) compared to the battery typically used in an EV. With a low enough range expectation, that's okay.

Yes, double the energy capacity by using two battery packs and you get (almost) twice the range - and that has been done in a few projects, mostly with Chevrolet Volt packs - but there are some complications for the battery management system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The usual problem with using PHEV components is that the motor is integrated with a transmission, so it's not convenient to use just the motor separately. The rear drive unit of the Outlander PHEV is a solution - it is completely separate from the engine and transmission in the front - but you need to keep in mind that it is only one of the Outlander's two motors, so it will only have adequate power if your vehicle is lighter.

The Outlander's rear drive unit motor is the Meiden Y61. The Outlander's motor/generators were discussed in the thread 67 VW Beetle motor - Meiden 60kW EV Motor?

The problem with PHEV batteries is that the are small (in energy capacity) compared to the battery typically used in an EV. With a low enough range expectation, that's okay.

Yes, double the energy capacity by using two battery packs and you get (almost) twice the range - and that has been done in a few projects, mostly with Chevrolet Volt packs - but there are some complications for the battery management system.
Hi Brian,

Thanks for your quick response.

In regards to the rear drive unit. This appears to be 60kW option which is roughly 80HP, although not blistering, should provide enough power for what I am after. So, if I were to obtain the motor drive unit, battery pack(s), controller and charger, this would be a good starting point?

Cheers
Andy
 

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I am doing the same build as you on a classic mini. I have mounted the transmission with the motor on it. I have the inverter. charger and potentiometer. I'm trying to find out how to make the inverter work out of the original vehicle on its own. Do I need the PHEV module? Is there any programming required to get the inverter independent.
what car are you converting

cheer
Juls
 

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In regards to the rear drive unit. This appears to be 60kW option which is roughly 80HP, although not blistering, should provide enough power for what I am after. So, if I were to obtain the motor drive unit, battery pack(s), controller and charger, this would be a good starting point?
Sorry, I guess I missed this when it was posted.

Yes, that set of components would be suitable for a small enough EV. The challenge, as Wright mentioned, is making all of the computerized components agree to work without the rest of the hybrid car's systems; this is the same problem as faced by anyone building an EV with salvaged EV (or PHEV) electronics.
 
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