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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone ever opened any of these?
It is a 0.6kWh 48v with a nominal voltage just above 43v which means it should be 12s. Probably physically divided into two rows of 6s.
At 0.6kWh it is not worth much, it is hardly above a e-bike battery.
But it is also a nice size to already get 48v from, which is typically only achieved with larger modules.
However, it will clearly be able to take and deliver much more amps because of battery size and it has ventilation running through the middle, with sensors at both ends of the channel.

But the connection plate doesn't have any live 48v on the + and -
Next to that there are two plugs, one going to the fan and sensors.
Meaning, there is something inside that controls it and a contactor that will also be in there.
The remaining connector uses 6 out of 8 pins, which means it will probably use CAN bus +/- and power +/- but I don't know what the other 2 are for.
Anyway, no 12 balancing wires to connect your own BMS to.
And the whole thing is glued on the top, so I cannot remove the top to look into it.
I cannot remove the connection plate, it is giving resistance from within.

So either find a way to open it (will be messy) or find a way to communicate with it.
If it fits your needs, I think it is a nice battery, because everything is inside of a very sturdy case, including cooling and a connector.
But because of that, I think communication will be very different from communication with a BMS slave board of a module.
It will probably operate its own BMS, managing everything (also balancing and disconnection when unsafe), and simply reporting its status
The question is if it needs some communication to power up or it may already open up its contacter for 48v when it thinks it is safe and gets 5v or 12v.

Office supplies Wood Bag Gadget Office equipment
(sturdy box with mounts like an engine mount)

Bumper Hood Automotive exterior Automotive lighting Motor vehicle
(left is fan, right connections)

Wood Bumper Tool Gas Hood
(fan with sensor for back end)

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exterior Bumper
(cooling channel through the middle)

Automotive tire Hood Crankset Circuit component Electrical wiring
fan pcb
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
This topic is not showing the listing? Still needs to be approved or something?
Edit: Ah now I notice the awaiting for approval bit.

Anyway, this is the detailed label. Showing all the info and that it is a Chinese made CATL battery.
At 43.2v divided by 12 it would mean 3.6v nominal per cell. 12s is at this point still an assumption.
Part number 5WA 915 107 or 5WA.915.107

Vehicle registration plate Motor vehicle Handwriting Vehicle Automotive exterior
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think the main purpose of reuse of these batteries would be exactly the same, to convert an existing petrol car to a mild hybrid.
I don't see many other uses, I also find 0.6kWh to little for my camper van, if I want to do more than running a water pump, lights and fridge.
And it is also heavier than my Bosch 500Wh e-bike battery. However, the casing is nice to put in some engine room (not to close to the engine/exhaust side) or similar.
And a 500Wh e-bike battery may be nice and compact, if you would use that in a mild hybrid kind of way, I think you would quickly fry it.
Would be interesting to know what the specs are on this battery, because I think they can withstand pretty high C rating, only lasting for a short time because then it is full or empty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That would be a good start, but I don't know how to find it. It is also from a relatively new car (2020) so I am not sure how much they are already sharing that, or where to find it.

But I found some more interesting technical info on the whole mild hybrid system.
I found that they are only using 250Wh of this 600Wh battery? Probably to allow for starting the engine, but they still have the 12v starter installed for cold starts.
Reported dimensions and weight of the battery module are 290 x 300 x 110 mm (probably without mounts) and 15 kg
The motor replacing the alternator is called the RSG.

The RSG has a peak generator power of 12kW and a peak drive power of 9kW. On a 600Wh battery C ratings are going through the roof, but that explains why you got such a bulky battery with air cooling. Because otherwise you could have 600Wh in a much smaller lighter package (like on an e-bike)
The RSG is still belt driven with its own guiders to keep tension on it.

It is reported that both the RSG motor as well as the battery are CAN bus connected.
I think this is really nice if these CAN messages were to be reverse engineered.
Because you get quite sturdy components with everything already on board (battery has BMS and contactor integrated, motor has controller integrated probably) and you can just drive them with CAN messages.

Next to that there should be a DC-DC converter from 48v to 12v rated at 275 Amps (not sure if peak power or continues). That is quite impressive as that is over 3kW!
And probably pretty sturdy made as well. It may output a charging voltage because it probably charges the 12v battery too.
Dimensions are 220 x 175 x 75 mm and 3 kg.

And the cars are fitted with a braking system that can mix regen braking with normal braking, which is to be expected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is most likely the DC-DC converter, which seems to have the same plug (on the left), probably meaning that is also CAN based, but that is a big assumption.
This is probably a very generic VW plug used in all kinds of components, perhaps always with same pinout?
Part number: 5WA 959 663
Aandrijfeenheid hybride Volkswagen Golf VIII 1.5 eTSI 16V - 5WA959663 VW-AG

I don't see the RSG motor listed, but oh well it is most likely there as well.

All in all a very interesting set to reuse, and control yourself through CAN, in converting an existing car into a mild hybrid.
DC-DC converter pretty powerful, and of course the RSG motor can be interesting components in itself.
The battery is not so impressive in terms of capacity versus size and weight, but is of course very suitable for this purpose and can clearly take very high C ratings.
 

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I don't know what the "R" in RSG would stand for - perhaps something in German - but this article from VW calls it a BSG (belt starter-generator):
That article includes nice illustrations of the mild hybrid system components and locations.

At that power level, it might be a fun system (without the DC-DC) for a kart, but it would only have sprint range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes but that article like other articals did not give technical info, which I found later behind register wall.

Anyway, you would rather replace battery fpr something else, but it is probably one of the highest specced C rating, given the info on the motor. In the peaks it is at 20C
 
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