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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I'm building my component list (ever changing), one of the items on my wishlist is to pull into a Tesla charging station and quick charge. What size components do I need to do that? Do I need to use the tesla onboard charger to do it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So I'd need a full tesla pack, tesla onboard charger, the the vin off a good tesla, like my friends... Does the charging port communicate via CAN to make sure its a good Tesla before charging or something?
 

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You have to register the CAR with Tesla in your name. I don't know if you need an onboard charger or not, since the supercharger is just a stack of onboard chargers in a box.

Tesla owners got attitude...even if you somehow do manage to deceive them into giving you account privileges, which I doubt since they can check the cameras on the car, if you're seen in a stall with a non-Tesla those smug accountants and sales execs will rat you out.
 

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But seriously... why Supercharger? If you're just wanting to fast DC charge, whether the battery modules are Tesla or not, the most practical bits to work with are apparently the CHAdeMO system used by Nissan, although there are apparently DIY solutions coming for the CCS system that almost everyone else uses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The dream is to pull up to a Tesla station, with my obvious not Tesla, and fast charge. Phoenix AZ has alot of stations, so I could get some good use out of them.

It's not the worst if I can't, but I'm in the beginning stages of pricing out my system, so I want to make sure I don't miss anything I would regret, Like 3.3 vs 6.6 vs 10KW onboard chargers.
 

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The dream is to pull up to a Tesla station, with my obvious not Tesla, and fast charge. Phoenix AZ has alot of stations, so I could get some good use out of them.
According to ChargeHub: Phoenix, Arizona EV Charging Stations Info, Phoenix has at least 41 fast charging stations. Filtering what appears on the map, only 4 are Tesla Superchargers; the rest are split almost evenly between CCS and CHAdeMO, but CCS is the standard which is gaining in the popularity race as non-Japanese manufacturers get into EVs.

Are you seeing Tesla cars at fast chargers and assuming that they are Tesla Superchargers? A Tesla car can charge at other charging stations, by using an adapter. It would be bad to be limited to just Superchargers.

It's not the worst if I can't, but I'm in the beginning stages of pricing out my system, so I want to make sure I don't miss anything I would regret, Like 3.3 vs 6.6 vs 10KW onboard chargers.
That makes sense, but it also means you should consider CCS fast charging support, not one proprietary system.

The onboard charger power rating has nothing to do with fast DC charging, but I assume that you know that. Certainly you will want a J1772 connector and onboard charger for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, at a reasonable rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The onboard charger power rating has nothing to do with fast DC charging, but I assume that you know that. Certainly you will want a J1772 connector and onboard charger for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, at a reasonable rate.
Going to have to fall on my sword here. I assume that the onboard charger power rating directly affected how fast you could charge your batteries. My assumption was that a 6.6kW charger could basically charge twice as fast as a 3.3kW charger...
 

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I assume that the onboard charger power rating directly affected how fast you could charge your batteries. My assumption was that a 6.6kW charger could basically charge twice as fast as a 3.3kW charger...
Yes, that is how roughly it works, but only if the power coming in to the vehicle is AC (at 120 V for Level 1 and 240 V for Level 2, assuming North American standards), which is then converted to DC at the battery voltage by the onboard charger. That's how you charge with a standard J1772 connection.

When you are fast DC charging, the power coming in to the vehicle is DC at the battery voltage because the AC-to-DC charger is in the charging station instead of the car. The onboard charger does nothing in this case, other than perhaps (depending on the charger) manage turning on the connection between the inlet socket and the battery. Something (the BMS, the charger... the details depend on the specific design) talks to the charging station to negotiate the appropriate charging current for the charging station to deliver.

Since the small onboard charger is not used when using a DC charging station, the charging rate can be much higher - a typical mid-range production EV might have a 7.2 kW onboard charger (so it is limited to that for Level 1 and Level 2), but will accept up to 50 kW from a fast DC charging station through a CCS or CHAdeMO (or Supercharger) connection. This higher charging power or "rate" than the onboard charger can handle is what is meant by "fast" charging.


A limitation with any style of charging - not really important compared to the fundamental difference above - is that the battery can only safely accept a limited current, and that current gets lower as the voltage gets higher (and the limiting charging voltage can only push an amount of current depending on how high the charging voltage is compared to the battery's internal voltage). That means that charging rate drops off near the end, and trying to go twice as fast will take more than half as much time.
 

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So I'd need a full tesla pack, tesla onboard charger, the the vin off a good tesla, like my friends... Does the charging port communicate via CAN to make sure its a good Tesla before charging or something?
You are having a discussion about technology when the real discussion is about policy. Tesla carefully controls connections to the SuperCharger network. While it is technically feasible to connect to a SuperCharger, by policy only Tesla authorized vehicles are allowed to do so. Everything else is theft by taking.

Tesla has disabled salvaged versions of their own cars from connecting to Superchargers. All the hardware and software to do that is in these Teslas. But the policy prevents a connection from completing.

You would be much better off adding Chademo, which is a standard that can both be implemented, and can be paid for.

ga2500ev
 
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