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Discussion Starter #1
I bought myself a Hitachi pumpmotor secondhand for $ 65,00.

I googled a while, but could’t found the information I need.

Specifications:

  • Hitachi
  • 14” long x 8” diameter
  • 48 volt
  • 8 kW (15 min.)
  • female shaft
  • It weighs about 88 lbs
As far as I can see in contains 4 brushes and has 2 terminals.

When I tested the motor it only run one direction.

Is this a serie wound, compound or ... motor?
Can someone tell me more about this or this kind of motor?
What kind of controller will performs satisfied?
What's that little green wire ?

Any info is appreciated.

Jeroen
 

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I bought myself a Hitachi pumpmotor secondhand for $ 65,00.

I googled a while, but could’t found the information I need.

Specifications:

  • Hitachi
  • 14” long x 8” diameter
  • 48 volt
  • 8 kW (15 min.)
  • female shaft
  • It weighs about 88 lbs
As far as I can see in contains 4 brushes and has 2 terminals.

When I tested the motor it only run one direction.

Is this a serie wound, compound or ... motor?
Can someone tell me more about this or this kind of motor?
What kind of controller will performs satisfied?
What's that little green wire ?

Any info is appreciated.

Jeroen
Looks to be a small single direction series wound motor with 4 single brushes. Should be OK for a small car if the direction is the right direction you need. Still not sure why people go out and buy stuff before they know what they need. The female shaft is going to make it more difficult to mate to the transmission but not impossible. These are pump motors and designed to run constantly. It has an internal cooling fan and should handle 120 volts with no problem and up to 5000 rpm if needed with out blowing apart. Many can do that. I'd not go much more than 5k rpm for safety reasons. Have you seen a blown commutator? I have. Not a pretty sight.

Most any normal controller should do. What kind of vehicle are you planning?

Pete :)
 

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Mostly good advice, Pete. Except this is a lift pump motor which is strictly intermittent duty, not continuous. Power steer pump motors run continuously. But the lift pump motors do not run except when there is demand. So there is always a heavy load on the lift pump motor. This means, if it series wound, which is likely, but not certain, at higher voltage and light loads, overspeed could be an issue.

major


These are pump motors and designed to run constantly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Looks to be a small single direction series wound motor with 4 single brushes. Should be OK for a small car if the direction is the right direction you need. Still not sure why people go out and buy stuff before they know what they need. The female shaft is going to make it more difficult to mate to the transmission but not impossible. These are pump motors and designed to run constantly. It has an internal cooling fan and should handle 120 volts with no problem and up to 5000 rpm if needed with out blowing apart. Many can do that. I'd not go much more than 5k rpm for safety reasons. Have you seen a blown commutator? I have. Not a pretty sight.

Most any normal controller should do. What kind of vehicle are you planning?

Pete :)


Hello Pete,

I bought this motor because EV parts are hard to get here in Europe. And the price was fair. I hope to modified the shaft of the hydraulic pump to solve the female shaft problem.

My intension is to use this motor for a LEV, see attachment (Microcar or something), 120 volt seems to be unwise (cause the weight). I consider to use maximum 72, maybe 84 volt.

What will happens when a pump motor will be used in a EV conversion, because you said it is designed to run constantly.

I consider a programmable (heavy) Kelly controller, like this:

http://www.newkellycontroller.com/kdh09400a24-96v400a-seriespm-p-289.html

1) programmable so I can program the properties

2) because the price

When a commutator is dirty it have to be cleaned up!



Grtz,

Jeroen
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This means, if it series wound, which is likely, but not certain, at higher voltage and light loads, overspeed could be an issue.

major

How can discover for sure what kind of motor this is?

Grtz, Jeroen
 

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If you can get inside the motor to have a look at the coils you will be able to see how it is wired up and get a good idea if it is series wound.

If the field coils are made of a few turns of heavy ribbon like conductor and it is connected at one end to the terminal and the other end to one of the brush posts then it is series wound. If the field coils are wound with many turns of very fine wire then it will be either compound or shunt wired. Best thing it so open it and photograph it. Then you can post the photos here for opinions.
Also have a good read of the sticky thread at the top of the motors forum on how to use a forklift motor, it will be invaluable.

Have you seen etlaare's Twingo conversion thread?
 
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