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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I have been given a couple of electric motors, an hydraulic pump and a contactor. This stuff is used on hydraulic tail lifts on trucks. I'm planning on using them on a kart for my ealdest kid and the bigger one on a motorcycle or moped(what ever possible). I do have some questions though as I am new to the the world of EV's.

1) Can somebody tell me what kind of motors these are (series/ PM or whatever...?) by looking at de specs?

2) Is it possible to up the voltage (ex. de 3 kw 24V to 48V)? If so what steps to take?

3) Both motors turn clockwise, if I cut the Hydraulic pump an inch or so, I can get both shafts to stick out en add a sprocket(cut one down to housing size of course), can I use the pump without the oil or do you think the shafts will eventually wear down?

Thanks for any remark,
David







 

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Hi everyone,

I have been given a couple of electric motors, an hydraulic pump and a contactor. This stuff is used on hydraulic tail lifts on trucks. I'm planning on using them on a kart for my ealdest kid and the bigger one on a motorcycle or moped(what ever possible). I do have some questions though as I am new to the the world of EV's.

1) Can somebody tell me what kind of motors these are (series/ PM or whatever...?) by looking at de specs?
Hi David,

Due to the fact that they have fixing screws at 90° around the middle of the frame, I'm guessing they are wound field motors, and almost certainly series motors.

2) Is it possible to up the voltage (ex. de 3 kw 24V to 48V)? If so what steps to take?
Sure. But you run the risk of burning the comm and brushes and breaking mechanical stuff unless you have a current limiting speed controller. And on the other end of the acceleration sequence, the higher voltage may cause overspeed, especially if lightly loaded.

3) Both motors turn clockwise, if I cut the Hydraulic pump an inch or so, I can get both shafts to stick out en add a sprocket(cut one down to housing size of course), can I use the pump without the oil or do you think the shafts will eventually wear down?
Yes.

edit...I mean you need oil.

They do look like nice little motors :)

major
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Major,

Thanks for your replay, I'll stay away from "tuning the engine" and run on basic principle of a 24V (12 V for the KAD 1206) battery pack.

Too bad the pump can't run without oil, maybe if I use grease in there, but best would be to make a new driveshaft and fixing house (I have no metal working background).

Would you say this controller would be a good choice to use with either of these 2 motors?

http://www.kellycontroller.com/kds24100100a12v-p-73.html

For now this is just a fiddle around project, I'm no expert on electric/electronic components (and certainly no math wizz kid) and with a one income, 2 parents and 3 kids householding there isn''t much left to start real big projects( Fullsize EV Car someday).

Thanks,
David
 

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Thanks for your replay, I'll stay away from "tuning the engine" and run on basic principle of a 24V (12 V for the KAD 1206) battery pack.

Too bad the pump can't run without oil, maybe if I use grease in there, but best would be to make a new driveshaft and fixing house (I have no metal working background).

Would you say this controller would be a good choice to use with either of these 2 motors?

http://www.kellycontroller.com/kds24100100a12v-p-73.html
Hi David,

I'll try to stay away from badmouthing Kelly controllers and keep gottdi off my case. Just to say, get the 200A model. The biggest highest rated one. That 100A model has a 40A cont rating. At 12V, that's only 480W and likely about a 1/4 to 1/2 hp out of the motor. These motors are not made to run efficiently at light loads. You can run light loads at reduced voltage, but your amp draw will be sizable. Get the highest rated controller you can.

And chopping the pump to get a shaft to mount a pulley is o.k. Just figure out a way to use some greased bearings on it. Not much else you can do with that tang/slot drive on the motor shaft output. I hate those things. Anything you do with it you are still likely to have it wear out shortly. Maybe periodically grease the tang and slot.

Regards,

major
 

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can't you replace the bearings on the pump motor with sealed (pre-greased) bearings? ofcourse that would depend on if its fitted with removable bearings, but in my experience, most motors are. if it is, take it apart and take the bearings to your local.. bearing shop. (well, theres one right where I live, theres bound to be more.)

waar woon je? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Major said:

That 100A model has a 40A cont rating. At 12V, that's only 480W and likely about a 1/4 to 1/2 hp out of the motor. These motors are not made to run efficiently at light loads. You can run light loads at reduced voltage, but your amp draw will be sizable. Get the highest rated controller you can.
If so then this one should be better to get the full efficiency out of it's potential.

http://www.kellycontroller.com/kd2430012v-24v300a-seriespm-p-167.html

With a continuous rating of 120A, this is near what de motor pumps out(3 KW motor).

AlexanderB said:

can't you replace the bearings on the pump motor with sealed (pre-greased) bearings?
Unfortunately, the pump oil is it's own bearing, because it's surrounded by oil under use it's held in place by aluminimum spacers(no bearings inside the pump). I therefore need grease to lubricate the sprockets, by closing de oil feed/exit end and adding a lubricating nipple I can maybe keep the wearing to a minimum.


I wish I add a better shaft connection, but these are the cards I got so better make best out of it.

Thanx for all your input.
David
 
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