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Even if you got good responses it's really hard to turn those into estimates for your own conversion. I've trawled EValbum to get a sense for mine and even with like vehicles, the batteries involved, weights, etc are all major variables. I've tempered my expectations downward knowing that my target vehicle is pretty much a brick and that between available batteries, space for them, and target voltage I probably can't clear about 38kwh of battery capacity for a vehicle that is probably close to 400wh/mi.
 

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Even if you got good responses it's really hard to turn those into estimates for your own conversion. I've trawled EValbum to get a sense for mine and even with like vehicles, the batteries involved, weights, etc are all major variables. I've tempered my expectations downward knowing that my target vehicle is pretty much a brick and that between available batteries, space for them, and target voltage I probably can't clear about 38kwh of battery capacity for a vehicle that is probably close to 400wh/mi.
You're quite right. I wouldn't want to get involved with specific makes and models of battery, but energy capacity (in kWh), GVM (gross vehicle mass), and an idea of Cd (drag coefficient) are all very useful things that can readily be compared. I am well aware that estimating Cd is very difficult! But knowing the model of car gives you some basis for comparison. My own converted car is the second-brickiest one on Australian roads, but GVM is less than 1000kg, so it's ideal for low speeds around town (which I walk anyway!).

I use the good old 5km/kWh rule of thumb.
 

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What is the .cd of your car?
How much does it weigh?
How big, in kWh, is the battery?
What is the average kWh consumption per 100km of your motor?

I've researched my car to be around .38cd
Estimated finished weight should be around 1200kg
Battery should be around 50kw.
Im using a loose estimate of 20kWh/100km, in practice it might be less, or if I drive it hard all the time, it might be higher.
Theoretical range is 250kms per full charge

 

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1985 Chevy S-10. Originally used 20 Trojan T-165 lead/acid batteries. Got as high as 43 miles range if I pushed it at surface street speeds but it kind of settled in at 23 miles range. Upgraded to 40 Leaf modules (80 cells) in two banks of 20 at 160 volts. Getting around 25 - 30 mile range at surface road speeds. I'm being very conservative in not overcharging or overdischarging keeping the cells in the range of 3.6 - 4.0 volts. No power steering, no power brakes.
 

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Just asking generally to see comparatively what's the best out there. I just want to know what car you converted to EV, what kind of batteries you are using, and what range you are getting? This would help me and many others in understanding what cars work well as a conversion in terms of drag (or maybe drivetrains like if awd, rwd, or fwd) or what batteries work best.
For example, if there are 2 Subarus on here, maybe one gets longer range because of the batteries they're using. And maybe someone else is using those same batteries but in a rwd car like bmw and they are getting better range.
From what I understand less mechanically moving parts the better on EV but still, I've seen some awd Subaru's converted before and I think knowing everyones setup might help us find ways to improve our designs.


Please only state your car, your batteries, and your range, nothing else unless describing your setup.
mitsubishi express van uses a 24kw/144v dc brushed motor connected to existing gearbox, 65kwh battery (fully charged 170v) range 220km, can do 105km/h
 

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I'll post when I finish my car but if you only wait a day and complain no one is helping then I think you're complaining too early. :)

Forums take time. Folks who finish their builds are probably not on the forum 24/7 and probably have their own numbers in their build threads. Unfortunately it appears this topic devolved and someone should just start a new one.

Interesting question though and I was interested in knowing what other folks got from their builds.
if you are still there email me directly on [email protected] i send you a pdf of my project
 

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I see the OP was banned. Here is a general rule of thumb for range,

A small well built car traveling at 60 mph will take around 200 WH/mile. My 85 RX7 takes around 205 WH/mile in average traffic conditions. Since it does not have regenerative braking it actually does better on the highway. To calculate a range from this take your battery size in WH (Average pack voltage times capacity in AH). My battery is 16000 WH or 16 KWH. Take the battery size and divide by WH/mile number. 16000/205 = 78. The RX-7 is a small 2 seater and it weighs just over 2000 lbs after the conversion. Original weight was a little over 2200 lbs. I managed just under 80 miles once. Car came to a stop about 0.2 miles from my house. Was a warm summer day and I knew it would be close. In winter a realistic range for that car would be less than 60 miles.

This is a rule of thumb only as there are so many factors involved. Lets look at my 2013 Tesla Model S. Rated at 300WH/mile (when traveling at 60 mph) I have a trip counter that I cleared when I got the car and it says my lifetime WH/mile average is 324. This is over 130000 miles about 120000 of those are highway miles. It supposedly has an 85kwh pack but hopefully everyone knows this was a lie. My car currently reports 244 miles range at 100% SOC. Working backwards 244*300 = 73200 Wh or 73.2 kwh. When I first got the car it reported 258 miles of range which works out to a usable battery capacity of 77.4 kwh.

A pickup trying to go at highway speeds would probably be over 500WH/mile.

Cold weather, wet or slippery road conditions, wind all affect these numbers. They affect all cars but when using gasoline most people don't pay any attention to just how bad their fuel economy is.
 

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2007 Ford Mustang
3800 lbs, stock body/aero
Tesla Base LDU
12 LG Chem Pacifica Hybrid batteries, 31kWh when new, about 30kWh now.
Averages about 375 Wh/mile mixed driving, including a lot of hooning about.
~80 miles useful range
 

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I see the OP was banned. Here is a general rule of thumb for range,

A small well built car traveling at 60 mph will take around 200 WH/mile. My 85 RX7 takes around 205 WH/mile in average traffic conditions. Since it does not have regenerative braking it actually does better on the highway. To calculate a range from this take your battery size in WH (Average pack voltage times capacity in AH). My battery is 16000 WH or 16 KWH. Take the battery size and divide by WH/mile number. 16000/205 = 78. The RX-7 is a small 2 seater and it weighs just over 2000 lbs after the conversion. Original weight was a little over 2200 lbs. I managed just under 80 miles once. Car came to a stop about 0.2 miles from my house. Was a warm summer day and I knew it would be close. In winter a realistic range for that car would be less than 60 miles.

This is a rule of thumb only as there are so many factors involved. Lets look at my 2013 Tesla Model S. Rated at 300WH/mile (when traveling at 60 mph) I have a trip counter that I cleared when I got the car and it says my lifetime WH/mile average is 324. This is over 130000 miles about 120000 of those are highway miles. It supposedly has an 85kwh pack but hopefully everyone knows this was a lie. My car currently reports 244 miles range at 100% SOC. Working backwards 244*300 = 73200 Wh or 73.2 kwh. When I first got the car it reported 258 miles of range which works out to a usable battery capacity of 77.4 kwh.

A pickup trying to go at highway speeds would probably be over 500WH/mile.

Cold weather, wet or slippery road conditions, wind all affect these numbers. They affect all cars but when using gasoline most people don't pay any attention to just how bad their fuel economy is.
ICE generally does better in cold weather due to air density...
 

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Just asking generally to see comparatively what's the best out there. I just want to know what car you converted to EV, what kind of batteries you are using, and what range you are getting? This would help me and many others in understanding what cars work well as a conversion in terms of drag (or maybe drivetrains like if awd, rwd, or fwd) or what batteries work best.
For example, if there are 2 Subarus on here, maybe one gets longer range because of the batteries they're using. And maybe someone else is using those same batteries but in a rwd car like bmw and they are getting better range.
From what I understand less mechanically moving parts the better on EV but still, I've seen some awd Subaru's converted before and I think knowing everyones setup might help us find ways to improve our designs.


Please only state your car, your batteries, and your range, nothing else unless describing your setup.
MG Midget, 10kWh lithium ion batteries, 45 mile range
Greg
 

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I see the OP was banned. Here is a general rule of thumb for range,

A small well built car traveling at 60 mph will take around 200 WH/mile. My 85 RX7 takes around 205 WH/mile in average traffic conditions. Since it does not have regenerative braking it actually does better on the highway. To calculate a range from this take your battery size in WH (Average pack voltage times capacity in AH). My battery is 16000 WH or 16 KWH. Take the battery size and divide by WH/mile number. 16000/205 = 78. The RX-7 is a small 2 seater and it weighs just over 2000 lbs after the conversion. Original weight was a little over 2200 lbs. I managed just under 80 miles once. Car came to a stop about 0.2 miles from my house. Was a warm summer day and I knew it would be close. In winter a realistic range for that car would be less than 60 miles.

This is a rule of thumb only as there are so many factors involved. Lets look at my 2013 Tesla Model S. Rated at 300WH/mile (when traveling at 60 mph) I have a trip counter that I cleared when I got the car and it says my lifetime WH/mile average is 324. This is over 130000 miles about 120000 of those are highway miles. It supposedly has an 85kwh pack but hopefully everyone knows this was a lie. My car currently reports 244 miles range at 100% SOC. Working backwards 244*300 = 73200 Wh or 73.2 kwh. When I first got the car it reported 258 miles of range which works out to a usable battery capacity of 77.4 kwh.

A pickup trying to go at highway speeds would probably be over 500WH/mile.

Cold weather, wet or slippery road conditions, wind all affect these numbers. They affect all cars but when using gasoline most people don't pay any attention to just how bad their fuel economy is.
Is your rx7, direct drive? AC or DC motor?
 
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