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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I'm trying to settle on a plug to use for my PFC-30. It comes with a NEMA 14-30 on it, and they say to use an adapter to convert it to other plug types. I'll probably put an adapter on the inside of the car to the gas tank lid, and I'm wondering why plug people most often use for a 30 amp charge. Should I use a locking plug, like the NEMA L6-30, or an unlocking one?

Any advice, or notes on what is the most common to use?

I'll also need to make up an extension cord to charge in my garage -- I can install whatever outlet I need at up to 50 amps. I already have a 6-50 plug for a powder coating oven, and another 50 amp one (forget the kind) for my welder.

corbin
 

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whoa, you guys have way too many different plugs over there, I'm glad we (europe) have a clear standard here.. 2 prong for low power devices, 3 prong for 230v/16a, a waterproof version with the same specs, and then waterproof plugs for 16, 32, 64 and 125A @400v 3phase.

that being said, I have no idea, just use the plug that is most suitable for your situation :). I think most people use the 30 amp plug because its the most common plug everywhere there? not everybody has 3phase or 50 amp outlets in their garage, and then still, they might want to charge at other places too.

I will either use one that would normally be used to plug in to motorhomes and caravans at campings on the car side, or a high power 3phase plug. (similar in size/build but different colour, number of prongs and keying).
On the wall side, I can use the same plug, or just get the "generic wall socket" plug as a short adapter cable too, for charging at other locations.
perhaps some mechanism to determine if your other end is plugged in to 3phase or to a standard wall socket. (and adapt charging power to that automatically, that would be cool :))
 

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Discussion Starter #3
whoa, you guys have way too many different plugs over there, I'm glad we (europe) have a clear standard here.. 2 prong for low power devices, 3 prong for 230v/16a, a waterproof version with the same specs, and then waterproof plugs for 16, 32, 64 and 125A @400v 3phase.

that being said, I have no idea, just use the plug that is most suitable for your situation :). I think most people use the 30 amp plug because its the most common plug everywhere there? not everybody has 3phase or 50 amp outlets in their garage, and then still, they might want to charge at other places too.

I will either use one that would normally be used to plug in to motorhomes and caravans at campings on the car side, or a high power 3phase plug. (similar in size/build but different colour, number of prongs and keying).
On the wall side, I can use the same plug, or just get the "generic wall socket" plug as a short adapter cable too, for charging at other locations.
perhaps some mechanism to determine if your other end is plugged in to 3phase or to a standard wall socket. (and adapt charging power to that automatically, that would be cool :))
Thanks -- I'm mainly curious about what other people go. I think I'm going to go NEMA 6-30, and probably non-locking.

corbin
 

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I'm using the 30 A locking plug, because I could fit it easier than the dryer plug, and I could buy a 25 ft extension cord for generators at Home Depot with matching plug for $65. My pack is max of about 124V at end of charge, so I only draw about 16A from a 240VAC outlet when charging at 30ADC. I also have a PFC30.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm using the 30 A locking plug, because I could fit it easier than the dryer plug, and I could buy a 25 ft extension cord for generators at Home Depot with matching plug for $65. My pack is max of about 124V at end of charge, so I only draw about 16A from a 240VAC outlet when charging at 30ADC. I also have a PFC30.

Awesome tom -- thanks for the info. The easy to buy extension cord is also something I was looking for -- it looks like that's what I'll be using.
corbin
 

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I'm using the 30 A locking plug, because I could fit it easier than the dryer plug, and I could buy a 25 ft extension cord for generators at Home Depot with matching plug for $65. My pack is max of about 124V at end of charge, so I only draw about 16A from a 240VAC outlet when charging at 30ADC. I also have a PFC30.
That would be a NEMA L6-30, which is a three prong 250 volt with two hots and a ground. I like Leviton products. Their car mount flanged plug is their #2625F.

By the way, doesn't your PFC30 cut back at 30 amps DC due to being thermally challenged? Seems you discussed this some time ago.

Russ Kaufmann

RUSSCO Engineering
 

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That would be a NEMA L6-30, which is a three prong 250 volt with two hots and a ground. I like Leviton products. Their car mount flanged plug is their #2625F.

By the way, doesn't your PFC30 cut back at 30 amps DC due to being thermally challenged? Seems you discussed this some time ago.
I've forgotten the designation (Edit: it is an L14-30C), but it is a four prong plug. If it wasn't dark and pouring and blowing rain outside, I would go out to the (separate) garage and look. :D The charger does cut back in hot summer temperatures when charging at 30ADC, but I charged at that current all last winter with no problem. At 100F it cuts back at around 28ADC. I've started charging at 26-27ADC now, unless I want to do a quick 1 hour or so charge to get back on the road, and the temperature is low enough to run it at higher output. I thought maybe I accelerated the failure of my input rectifier board by stressing it at high temperatures. It would be nice if Rich supplied a derating curve.
 

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I've forgotten the designation, but it is a four prong plug.
That would be a NEMA 14-30 which is the wrong plug type for the application, unless you needed 120 volt along with 240.

A NEMA 14-30 is a 4 Wire with an EGC. One of the 4 lines is the grounded circuit conductor (neutral conductor) which derives 120 volts. Only place you see them occasionally is something like a close dryer, where the motor and controls operate at 120 volts and the heating elements work on 240 volts.

For a 240 volt charger all you need is L1, L2, and G. Neutral serves no purpose.
 

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So if I wanted a twist-locking style connector for a 5kw, 220v/110v Elcon charger where either 220v or 110v would operate the charger and 120v would operate a charge-interlock relay at all times... could I use a NEMA L14-30?
 

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That would be a NEMA 14-30 which is the wrong plug type for the application, unless you needed 120 volt along with 240.
The plug is an L14-30C. The PFC30 operates off 240VAC or 120VAC. I have several adapter pigtails to use either. I also run an interlock relay off the 120VAC. These plugs are pricey compared to a "dryer plug" like the NEMA 14-50 or 30, but those wouldn't fit in the space I had, and the $65.00 Home Depot 240VAC/30A generator extension cord comes with this type connectors. Problem is, each of the adapter pigtails requires one of those pricey L14-30C connectors.
 

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So if I wanted a twist-locking style connector for a 5kw, 220v/110v Elcon charger where either 220v or 110v would operate the charger and 120v would operate a charge-interlock relay at all times... could I use a NEMA L14-30?
I would think so because it is 4-wire (L1, L2, N, + G) You have to have neutral to derive 120 VAC.

I am curious about the charger being either 240 or 120. At 120 the power would have to be half right? No way to get 5 Kw at 120 volt with 30 amps. Technically to be code and UL compliant the maximum continuous load current you can run on a connector is 80 % of the rating. So with that said I would think the max power at 120 volts would be 2660 watts.
 

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Correct. When hooked into a 110v circuit the charger only puts out half the power... actually more like 2100 watts. Haven't tried it on 220v yet, but it's an Elcon PFC 5000, so it's designed to output 5kw with the right source.

 
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