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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the middle of removing the ICE from the donor car. I'd like suggestions on the best or a good way to clean the engine area. Here are my considerations:

1) This is in my garage. I'd like to avoid creating a toxic waste dump. It's ironic to pollute while going green.
2) I see this as possibly a 2 stage cleaning. One is just enough to see the ICE better. The second is to clean the compartment area after removing the ICE.
3) The engine was running and I'd like to sell it (reuse). So I'd like the cleaning not to damage the engine.

Thanks.
 

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I'm in the middle of removing the ICE from the donor car. I'd like suggestions on the best or a good way to clean the engine area. Here are my considerations:

1) This is in my garage. I'd like to avoid creating a toxic waste dump. It's ironic to pollute while going green.
2) I see this as possibly a 2 stage cleaning. One is just enough to see the ICE better. The second is to clean the compartment area after removing the ICE.
3) The engine was running and I'd like to sell it (reuse). So I'd like the cleaning not to damage the engine.

Thanks.
Place an inflateable childrens swimming pool under the vehicle, Get one large enough that the front wheels will be within the pool and then inflate it. Use detergent based cleaners (simple green and others) and not too much water to loosen the big stuff. Scrape, brush and rinse the big stuff. When you reach a point of diminishing returns allow the water to evaporate and deflate and roll up and bag the pool and take ti to a commercial recycler. For the remaining mess, trailer, tow or drive the vehicle to a car wash that has engine cleaning options (they meet water treatment standards) and finish up.

Another alternative is a commercial stripping and cleaning company.

I did this a (long) while ago to keep a driveway clean. It should also work to help keep the enviornment clean.
 

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Oil eater from costco works very well.

You can take it to a coin operated car wash, and use their high pressure washers. I think in california, they are required to have a pond skimmer to catch the oil.

I'm in the middle of removing the ICE from the donor car. I'd like suggestions on the best or a good way to clean the engine area. Here are my considerations:

1) This is in my garage. I'd like to avoid creating a toxic waste dump. It's ironic to pollute while going green.
2) I see this as possibly a 2 stage cleaning. One is just enough to see the ICE better. The second is to clean the compartment area after removing the ICE.
3) The engine was running and I'd like to sell it (reuse). So I'd like the cleaning not to damage the engine.

Thanks.
 

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I did initial engine cleaning at car wash, then used 'Easy Off' oven cleaner for first pass, then orange oil based 'green' cleaner. I put cardboard under to catch drips, but just wiped w/ rags and rinsed in buckets. Probably not the most eco since I tossed greasy water on our dirt road... But I figured to soaps pretty much broke it down, and whatever oil was left would help hold the dust down on the road.
 

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What kind of car? I know a guy that cleaned the engine in his Corvette. The water ruined his opti-spark ignition to the tune of several hundred dollars. I know this is different, but I have used liquid drano to clean things like valve covers, timing chain covers, intake manifolds, etc. Just be careful because drano is nasty stuff. The good thing is that when you are done, you can just dump it down the drain, it was going there anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What kind of car? I know a guy that cleaned the engine in his Corvette. The water ruined his opti-spark ignition to the tune of several hundred dollars. I know this is different, but I have used liquid drano to clean things like valve covers, timing chain covers, intake manifolds, etc. Just be careful because drano is nasty stuff. The good thing is that when you are done, you can just dump it down the drain, it was going there anyhow.
1985 VW Cabriolet
 

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I recommend a brand new line of products by VeruTEK, Inc. They have a 100% "green" heavy oil cleaner and one to treat lighter oiled surfaces. You can simply spray the engine compartment with one of these products, let it work for about 2 hours, and then wash with a regular garden hose/nozzle. What is left after treatment is carbon and water, so it is safe, even helpful for the storm drains.

VeruTEK products are not in the stores yet, it is that game-changing and new. I am a distributor for VeruTEK, so if you want to contact me about ordering, please do so...I will often send free samples if the customer agrees to take pictures of the cleaning event.

Thanks for being concerned about being environmentally friendly!
 
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