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Ok, they’re from salvage cars. But almost Every vendor says they’re from cars with under 20,000 miles. How is that possible?
Battery failure is a not an uncommon Tesla problem, so besides salvage cars, might these modules be coming from warranty replacements? I could see Tesla selling off the whole pack versus trying to troubleshoot, repair, and warranty a rebuilt pack.
What’s the general consensus on the 20,000 mile claim?
 

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People get Teslas that are the first car they've ever owned that does 0-60mph in under 5 seconds, they're much more likely to show off and run out of talent than if they got a more ordinary ICE.

Cars owned in large cities will spend a lot of time not going very fast, and when they do get going, the flows of traffic create conflict scenarios where frustrated drivers are driving too close to each other, too fast for the sightlines and not paying enough attention. The average speed of cars in London is about 7mph. You can run that fast. Despite this, drivers still achieve high enough speeds to get speeding tickets.

Given that California is one of Tesla's primary markets, and LA was designed to cater to car drivers but badly so there's inadequate public transport and traffic jams 10 lanes wide... I'd guess most batteries are coming from CA cars being crashed or crashed into by inattentive or frustrated drivers, hard enough to distort the shell's suspension hardpoints but not so hard that the area between the wheels deforms and damages battery modules.
 

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An old motorcycle truism: the most dangerous time to own a motorcycle is the first 6 months.

And since Tesla is the only place to get it repaired, the insurance company would rather take the loss than pay multiple times the new price for repairs.

My Golf cost 34,000 new. In parts to make one new 100,000.
 

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Does anybody know how to check the year that a battery was produced? EVWest has pinouts for REV A,B,C BMS. Does anybody know how these line up with manufacture year.

The reason I ask is that I had to replace one module out of 5 on my EV conversion. The seller said the battery was from a 2017 model but it had a BMS circuit board attached to the module which appears to be the Rev A connection. Which I would assume is 2012/13.
 

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I'd guess most batteries are coming from CA cars being crashed or crashed into by inattentive or frustrated drivers, hard enough to distort the shell's suspension hardpoints but not so hard that the area between the wheels deforms and damages battery modules.
You're kind of bumping into why they total out. Expensive labor rates, expensive tools, and expensive parts (example: the rear "dogleg" external sheet metal running from the rear sail window down to mid-sill against which a Falconwing door seals, maybe 4 feet by 8" raw aluminum sheet before stamping is around $600. Use of salvage components is forbidden by Tesla for "crash safety") combined with two factors: a) crash safety, which means metal crumples easily and the car is specifically designed for passing tests - hit the front frame rails anything but headon, or miss them outboard so it rips the suspension off, or hit a pole dead center b) a complete disregard for easy repair - stupid stuff like putting suspension bolts in backwards on A-arms so you have to drop the drive unit to replace a bolt; and not seaming the rear panels for common "minor" impact repairs...and you have the recipe for an easy total.

The low polar moment around the CG makes for nice handling, but causes the car to spin easily if hit off-axis, causing both front and rear damage in a front-ender or rear-ender collision. You'll get these in rain or snow/ice.

Now to location - I like to call it Volvo syndrome. Many bad drivers are bad because they are scared $hitless behind the wheel. They buy Volvos and Subarus because of safety claims...as if a safe car will fix inept driving. So, Teslas are magnets for inept drivers. And then Teslas multiply ineptness by providing 400HP minimum in the cars -- I'm of the opinion drivers should be required to have special endorsements at 300HP and another at 500HP, much like propeller-plane pilots do.

Your theory of California, though, tends more towards guessing than fact. In my observation, the distribution of totaled cars actually seems pretty even, countrywide. While some key salvage places are in California, the salvage cars pop up everywhere and I can't say there's a noticeable increase in the California body count. My theory there is that places like San Fran, L.A. and San Diego are full of peacocks - they buy Teslas for the same reason they used to buy Beemers. Status. Those cars almost never leave the city.

So, no - California is not a gold mine for batteries. I wish it was. I had to ship my Model S parts donor car to the Pacific Northwet from Long Island, NY. The cars are where the money is and where peacocks and inept drivers are. Everywhere and in low quantity. No huge quantity of totaled Teslas (MS and MX is where my observations are for) in California.
 
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