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I’m trying to think of what it would take to convert an existing AWD car to hybrid without disrupting the AWD system. Specifically a Subaru, where the center diff is locked between 60:40 to 50:50 range and isn’t open.
 

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Going to be incredibly tough because modern cars are packaged tightly to maximize efficiency of design. On a Subaru you could possibly put a sprocket on the rear driveshaft and cut away body to try and fit a motor next to it.
 

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Hybrid is near impossible. Full EV with the motor in place of the engine is much easier - other than finding space for cells.

I'd love to convert my Outback XT some day, but batteries are definitely the challenge. Maybe with solid state cells in the future.
 

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Hybrid is near impossible. Full EV with the motor in place of the engine is much easier - other than finding space for cells.

I'd love to convert my Outback XT some day, but batteries are definitely the challenge. Maybe with solid state cells in the future.
Ah yeah I missed the hybrid part.

One idea is to hook a motor up to the timing belt. Not sure if it would work, but it's a thought.
 

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One idea is to hook a motor up to the timing belt. Not sure if it would work, but it's a thought.
That's a P0 or P1f parallel hybrid configuration, meaning that the motor is connected to the "front" (accessory end) of the engine. This is the least capable hybrid system, because it is limited in how much electric motor power can be handled and because it can't drive the vehicle without the engine running; it is only used for "mild" hybrid systems, and it does work for that purpose.

You don't actually use the timing belt , but a separate belt to its own crank pulley.
 

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Is there some way to install 2 motors - connect one to the rear diff and one to the front? I am interested in doing something similar, so glad you asked this question, though I am looking for something a little bigger - maybe a Suzuki Samari? I have measured the newer cars (2005+) and also found that there is little empty space in them these days.
 

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Is there some way to install 2 motors - connect one to the rear diff and one to the front? I am interested in doing something similar, so glad you asked this question, though I am looking for something a little bigger - maybe a Suzuki Samari? I have measured the newer cars (2005+) and also found that there is little empty space in them these days.
There is always a way to do anything you want.

-Cheap
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Pick two.
 

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Can you do this? or do you need at least a short driveshaft to help cushion the motor from some of the bumps?
The original proposal was for a car in which the rear has independent suspension, so the differential does not move with the suspension. If you were to connect a motor to the Samari's rear axle, you would need to either use a jointed shaft, or have the motor attached to the axle (which the motor can withstand, but isn't good for suspension performance).
 

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Is there some way to install 2 motors - connect one to the rear diff and one to the front?
The original proposal was to leave the AWD system intact. As an alternative, it would be practical to eliminate the mechanical connection between axles of the stock AWD system and to drive each axle with a separate motor; Toyota does that in their transverse-engine hybrids (such as the RAV4 and Highlander) so the rear axle has only electric drive (with the power being generated by the engine and the generator of the hybrid transaxle) and the front axle is driven by the engine and hybrid transaxle.

I am interested in doing something similar, so glad you asked this question, though I am looking for something a little bigger - maybe a Suzuki Samari?
Any recent Subaru is much bigger than a Samauri.
 

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I’m trying to think of what it would take to convert an existing AWD car to hybrid without disrupting the AWD system. Specifically a Subaru, where the center diff is locked between 60:40 to 50:50 range and isn’t open.
I have a PICKUP truck AWD. It has two motors front and head with separate gearboxd's. Rear motor drives a short 10" driveshaft. I believe they work to equalized load and current draw through the regenerative brake guns. ? Hope that is helpful..
D
 

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I have a PICKUP truck AWD. It has two motors front and head with separate gearboxd's. Rear motor drives a short 10" driveshaft. I believe they work to equalized load and current draw through the regenerative brake guns. ? Hope that is helpful..
D
This is the Phoenix SUT. It is based on the SsangYong Actyon so in the rear it has a beam axle, and so the short shaft to a motor mounted to the frame makes sense; this would correspond to a suitable design for a Samurai (but not for a Subaru, which could use but wouldn't need the shaft).

I think the "autocorrect" feature messed things up here... "gearboxd's" was obviously supposed to be "gearboxes" and I assume that "front and head" was supposed to be "front and rear", but I don't know that "guns" was supposed to be.

Running with equal load (torque output) is pretty good, but ideally the torque would be distributed more to the more heavily loaded axle (including the load shift due to acceleration), if a tire slips the torque to that motor would be reduced (traction control), and if the control system detects excessive understeer or oversteer the drive torque would be adjusted to suit (stability control).
 

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Yes they are traction motors. Correct. Sounds like you know some stuff buddy. About Phoenix Actyon endeavours. Kinda left out of the history book. Is love to talk to you sometime. As far as AwD. ... Phoenix m.c. integrated the TCM transmission module for control of solenoids for brakes ,self parking, suspension modes, not sure all but left the brains and Removed the actual transmission. Just a lonely shift lever. May be a good thought to do the same . Or that could complicate things so much you go bankrupt. Like Phoenix.
Might be better modern solutions.
 

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I have a PICKUP truck AWD. It has two motors front and [rear] with separate gearboxd's
...
I believe they work to equalized load and current draw through the regenerative brake guns. ? Hope that is helpful..
D
... I don't know that "guns" was supposed to be.
Brake drums. Darn auto correct...
Okay... but "regenerative brake drums" doesn't quite make sense, either. The control system would appropriately balance both drive torque from the motors as well as regenerative braking torque from the motors; it also needs to reduce the hydraulic brake system pressure to reduce braking by the friction brakes (disks, and drums if it has rear drum brakes) to compensate for the regenerative braking.

AWD is a good thing to have with regenerative braking, because balanced front and rear braking can be achieved without having to use the friction brakes.
 

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Makes sense so good that its on there. Why are not alll highway , normal use vehicles all wheel drive? For various reasons.
 
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