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Who ever want that your car does not need a charger but just need a power socket ?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I am curious to know that why EV maker does not make the charging electronics inside / undetachable to the car. It can replace the level 1 and 2 of the charger. Is it feasible?
 

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It's not clear to me what you are asking. Every production EV does have charging electronics onboard the car to convert utility AC power to DC power at the battery voltage; the electronics in a Level 1 or Level 2 AC charging station just communicate with car to turn on power only when the charging cable is safely connected, and to manage billing for the purchased energy. Every car that I've heard of also comes with a portable adapter to plug the car into an ordinary outlet; this doesn't do any power conversion and it isn't built in because supporting both proper charging stations and a cord directly to an ordinary outlet would require an extra inlet connector and coordination between the two inlets.

Without an onboard charger, the car would only be able to charge from a DC source, and public DC charging stations are relatively rare compared to AC (level 1 and level 2) charging stations and ordinary outlets. Very few people would be satisfied with the limitations of having no onboard charger, so it doesn't make sense to build the car that way for sale to the public. You can do this with your own conversion if it suits you, of course.

There are electric vehicles without an onboard charger at all - typically they operate from a fixed base or between a very limited number of points which can be equipped to charge them. Examples include ferries, racing cars, and the electric training aircraft from Pipistrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's not clear to me what you are asking. Every production EV does have charging electronics onboard the car to convert utility AC power to DC power at the battery voltage; the electronics in a Level 1 or Level 2 AC charging station just communicate with car to turn on power only when the charging cable is safely connected, and to manage billing for the purchased energy. Every car that I've heard of also comes with a portable adapter to plug the car into an ordinary outlet; this doesn't do any power conversion and it isn't built in because supporting both proper charging stations and a cord directly to an ordinary outlet would require an extra inlet connector and coordination between the two inlets.

Without an onboard charger, the car would only be able to charge from a DC source, and public DC charging stations are relatively rare compared to AC (level 1 and level 2) charging stations and ordinary outlets. Very few people would be satisfied with the limitations of having no onboard charger, so it doesn't make sense to build the car that way for sale to the public. You can do this with your own conversion if it suits you, of course.

There are electric vehicles without an onboard charger at all - typically they operate from a fixed base or between a very limited number of points which can be equipped to charge them. Examples include ferries, racing cars, and the electric training aircraft from Pipistrel.

thankyou for reply, I was asking that there are OBC but they are detachable as a travel charger. I want to know that why there is no inside(integrated to power train)charger tech. instead of this conventional one.
 

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... I was asking that there are OBC but they are detachable as a travel charger. I want to know that why there is no inside(integrated to power train)charger tech. instead of this conventional one.
The "travel charger" is not a charger: it doesn't do any power conversion, as I mentioned:
Every car that I've heard of also comes with a portable adapter to plug the car into an ordinary outlet; this doesn't do any power conversion and it isn't built in because supporting both proper charging stations and a cord directly to an ordinary outlet would require an extra inlet connector and coordination between the two inlets.
This is a travel charging adapter cord in the back of a Leaf, along with some other stuff:


And this is the actual onboard charger of a Leaf:

... a much larger, liquid-cooled chunk of hardware that occupies much of the top part of the big case above the motor.

What you want appears to be an inlet on the outside of the car that you can just plug an extension cord into to use an ordinary outlet. That would still require you to carry (or leave at the outlet) an extension cord, so just think of the travel charging adapter as a special extension cord that is more suitable for the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The "travel charger" is not a charger: it doesn't do any power conversion, as I mentioned:


This is a travel charging adapter cord in the back of a Leaf, along with some other stuff:


And this is the actual onboard charger of a Leaf:

... a much larger, liquid-cooled chunk of hardware that occupies much of the top part of the big case above the motor.

What you want appears to be an inlet on the outside of the car that you can just plug an extension cord into to use an ordinary outlet. That would still require you to carry (or leave at the outlet) an extension cord, so just think of the travel charging adapter as a special extension cord that is more suitable for the job.

Thanks man, this changes my thinking perspective. can you please share some journal papers or anything about its circuitry then it will be great
 

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My car has this charger inside:


I connect the blue, yellow, and brown wires to a plug. I use an extension cord to plug the car into the wall.



I use a relay to turn the driving computer (VCU) off when the car is plugged in. The relay has an AC trigger.
 

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Hello, I am curious to know that why EV maker does not make the charging electronics inside / undetachable to the car. It can replace the level 1 and 2 of the charger. Is it feasible?
It's a safety issue. An EVSE is used in place of a simple cord for 3 reasons:

1. Make sure that the circuit has a proper ground.
2. Be sure that the EVSE is connected to an EV before providing power.
3. Negotiating the amount of available power that the EV can draw.

One can take a J1772 handle, drop it in a bucket of water, and have nothing happen. Cannot say the same for a live cord plugged directly into an EV.

ga2500ev
 
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